The Internet is good for some things, but not for telling you what firearm is best for you!

Recently on a Facebook group I read and follow, a well-meaning person asked the group in general what type of handgun she should buy. She gave a little bit of info in that she was a shorter-in-stature female but that was it.

And of course the responses were many and varied as greatly as the types of firearms recommended. And some of the responses are just plain bad advice.

And while some of those are great suggestions, firearms are not a one-size-fits-a-certain-sized-person application. Also, some handguns are not made for concealed carry or for personal defense, although almost all will do that if you have it in your hand at the time.

If you are looking at getting a handgun, what are you getting it for? Learning to shoot a handgun? Self-defense at home or to conceal-carry? There are many factors that go into what you look for in a handgun and, to be honest, the Internet and complete strangers is not the place to look for help.

If you are looking for a handgun or wanting to learn to shoot a handgun, go to a reputable gun range or gun store. Or find a reputable firearms instructor that you check the references or reviews on, and get them to show you different firearms. DO NOT buy a firearm you’ve not shot on a range! Handguns can look and feel very different. But until you actually shoot it on the range, you cannot know how it feels in your hand and how you like or dislike the way it functions. Not all handguns are created equal.

So, if you are new to firearms or handguns, do not take advice from the Internet. Find a real person who is a professional and knows what they are doing when it comes to handguns or training.

Once you do decide on a handgun, make sure to get training in how to use it properly and how to shoot it. Remember why you were getting it in the first place. Isn’t your life (or the life of your loved ones) worth the time, effort and money to do it right?

Dummy drills – good for trigger control and malfunction drills.

 

Using dummy rounds is a great way to learn how to clear malfunctions and also to work on trigger control! What I have found to be a very effective way of improving a shooters skill is to mix live and dummy rounds in a magazine and insert it in the firearm, then have the shooter go through a course of fire that requires them to shoot, and clear any malfunctions caused by the dummy rounds.

When the shooter squeezes the trigger on a dummy round, the firearm should not move at all! It should be steady and not “jerking” down. If it does jerk down the shooter is anticipating the recoil and causes the rounds to go low. Also, commonly called flinching.

After working dummy drills for a while, then try a full good live magazine and see if the shooters accuracy and handling has improved.

The shooter above as you can see and hear by the “click” has dummy rounds, the firearm does not move, he taps the bottom of the magazine, step one in clearing a malfunction is to make sure the magazine is seated properly), then he tilts the firearm to the right a bit and cycles the slide to remove the bad round. Tilting it to the right a bit allows gravity to assist in the round coming out in case the extractor had not engaged the case., then back on target and another squeeze of the trigger. This shooter has very good steady trigger control and malfunction clearing.